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Article
August 1977

Primary Care Medicine

Arch Intern Med. 1977;137(8):983. doi:10.1001/archinte.1977.03630200001001

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Abstract

Beginning at home  A "model home," converted from a schoolhouse, is part of the rehabilitation medicine program at Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, Calif, to show patients how they can be as independent as possible after discharge.Patients learn to perform household chores and practice with assist devices. If a special device is needed, Rancho's biomedical engineers, like Arthur Heyer (photo), a quadriplegic who has his office in the model home, design it.Mechanical engineer Heyer works at a desk with two revolving disks— one for reference books and files, the other for typing and dictating—that he operates with a mouthstick."This office is an excellent example of how well the handicapped can manage, given the appropriate equipment," says Donald McNeal, MD, director of the Neuromuscular Engineering Unit, Rancho-University of Southern California Rehabilitation Engineering Center. And that is true of the rest of the house."Some of the equipment we

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