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Article
November 1978

Pseudomonas maltophilia Causing Heroin-Associated Infective Endocarditis

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, Calif. Drs Yu and Wing are now with the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Dr Rumans is now with the US Naval Medical Research Unit #2, Jakarta Detachment, Indonesia, APO, San Francisco; Dr Harvey is now with the Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology, University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver; and Dr Deresinski is now with the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa.

Arch Intern Med. 1978;138(11):1667-1671. doi:10.1001/archinte.1978.03630360049022
Abstract

The association of Pseudomonas maltophilia endocarditis in three patients with recent history of intravenous drug abuse is reported. All three patients had abnormal heart valves (two prosthetic and one rheumatic). A prominent characteristic of this uncommon pathogen is its in vitro resistance to the commonly used antimicrobials. Cure was achieved in all three cases. In two cases, synergistic antibiotic combinations were used. In one case, plasmid-mediated resistance to amikacin sulfate (Amikan, British; no comparable US product) emerged during therapy. The two patients with prosthetic valves received combined surgical and antibiotic therapy.

(Arch Intern Med 138:1667-1671, 1978)

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