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Article
August 1981

In Reply.-

Author Affiliations

Little Rock, Ark

Arch Intern Med. 1981;141(9):1243. doi:10.1001/archinte.1981.00340090139044
Abstract

Except for a few points, I do not think we have a major disagreement. Quoting from my article: "One advantage of the nasal cannula over a mask is that it allows the patient to cough, eat, and talk without removal of the cannula." This is essentially the same statement you made in your letter. Thus, I do not think we disagree on this matter. However, just because both you and I prefer a nasal cannula does not mean that the rest of the world should. The important point is that "controlled oxygen" should be used either by nasal cannula or a Venturi mask. Either is medically acceptable. Most institutions give the physician an option to use either a nasal cannula or a Venturi mask, and, thus, I disagree with your statement that few persons make use of the Venturi mask at this time.

Also, we do not differ on the

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