[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.130.145. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1982

The National Exercise and Heart Disease ProjectLong-term Psychosocial Outcome

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry (Dr Stern) and the Biostatistical Center (Ms Cleary), George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Arch Intern Med. 1982;142(6):1093-1097. doi:10.1001/archinte.1982.00340190049009
Abstract

• Six hundred fifty-one men who suffered at least one myocardial infarction eight weeks to 36 months earlier were randomly assigned to participate for at least two years as control subjects or subjects in a prescribed, supervised exercise training program. Psychosocial results at baseline and at the sixth-month, one-year, and two-year follow-ups are presented. With minimal exception, no differences were noted between the control and exercise groups at any of the testing periods. Several explanations for the lack of exercise-induced psychosocial benefit are provided.

(Arch Intern Med 1982;142:1093-1097)

×