August 1983

Specialty Choices and Board Certifications of 'Fifth Pathway' Graduates

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine (Dr Rosner) and the Office of the Vice President for Education and Research (Dr Cohen), Queens Hospital Center Affiliation of the Long Island Jewish-Hillside Medical Center, Jamaica, NY, the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Medicine (Drs Rosner and Cohen); and the University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington (Dr Mulvihill).

Arch Intern Med. 1983;143(8):1586-1588. doi:10.1001/archinte.1983.00350080104023

• We studied the specialty choices and board certification status of 258 graduates over a ten-year period of a single "fifth pathway" program. Not including obstetrics and gynecology as a primary care specialty, 54% of our graduates chose primary care specialties. Including obstetrics and gynecology, the number increased to 63%. Thirty-five of 158 graduates through 1978 are specialty board certified and another 49 are board eligible. We believe that our program has fulfilled the need of assisting Americans studying medicine abroad, primarily in Mexico, to overcome their clinical deficits and become integrated into the mainstream of American medicine. The future role of fifth pathway programs must be reevaluated in light of the 1980 Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee report, which concluded that by 1990, there will be an overabundance of physicians in the United States.

(Arch Intern Med 1983;143:1586-1588)