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Article
February 1984

Effects of Indoramin Therapy on BP, Renal Function, and Body Fluid Composition

Author Affiliations

From the Medical (Dr Bauer) and Nursing (Mss Jones and Gaddy) Services, The Harry S Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, University of Missouri Hospital and Clinics, Columbia, Mo.

Arch Intern Med. 1984;144(2):308-312. doi:10.1001/archinte.1984.00350140116017
Abstract

• Indoramin hydrochloride is a new α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Eleven hypertensive men in whom the BP was normalized with indoramin underwent assessment of renal function, renal hemodynamics, and body fluid composition following short-term (three to six weeks), long-term (five to six months), and withdrawal (two weeks) therapy. Short-term indoramin therapy produced a 28% increase in glomerular filtration rate, a 24% increase in effective renal plasma flow, and a 31% decrease in renal vascular resistance. Although urine flow rate and free water clearance were unchanged, fractional sodium excretion decreased 38%. Long-term indoramin therapy was associated with qualitatively similar renal effects, but the changes did not achieve statistical significance. Plasma volume was increased only during short-term therapy; however, body weight was increased following both short- and long-term therapy. Indoramin effectively lowers BP without producing deleterious renal effects.

(Arch Intern Med 1984;144:308-312)

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