February 1986

Clinical Investigative Neuro-oncology

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Neurological Surgery and Neurobiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill.

Arch Intern Med. 1986;146(2):374-377. doi:10.1001/archinte.1986.00360140204030

The major thrust of the investigative work going on in the neurosurgical laboratories at Duke University, Durham, NC, in the late 1950s centered about mechanisms of regional perfusion or infusion of chemical agents into the carotid circulation. The rationale was that such technical advances might permit a more concentrated entry of antineoplastic agents into the tissues of the brain hosting a neoplasm. Those laboratory efforts were developing, therefore, at the same time that the institution was mobilizing its efforts to "open the doors" to the Clinical Research Unit for the first time. By the time the Clinical Research Unit opened in December 1960 as a few designated beds on Welch Ward, regional carotid artery-jugular vein perfusions of the brains of patients with malignant gliomas had already been performed (the first on Oct 31,1958), using a mechanical blood pump oxygenator apparatus with heat exchanger. A report of those cases appeared in

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