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Article
March 1989

Short-Course Therapy for Catheter-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver. Dr Ehni is now in private practice in Edmonds, Wash. Dr Reller is now with Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

Arch Intern Med. 1989;149(3):533-536. doi:10.1001/archinte.1989.00390030039007
Abstract

• To determine the efficacy of "short-course" therapy (<17 days) for Staphylococcus aureus catheter-associated bacteremia, 13 patients were prospectively followed up for at least three months after completion of therapy. A single patient relapsed after 28 days with endocarditis. No clinical or microbiological predictors of relapse could be identified, and coexistent medical conditions associated with some degree of immunosuppression did not appear to predispose to relapse. The results of this study and a review of the literature indicate that short-course therapy for uncomplicated S aureus catheter-associated bacteremia has a relapse rate of only 5% to 10% and, therefore, is reasonable therapy for this condition. The majority of relapses are endocarditis and occur within ten weeks after completion of therapy. Close follow-up during this period is essential.

(Arch Intern Med 1989;149:533-536)

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