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Special Article
November 12, 2001

Accuracy and Ambiguity in Counseling Patients About Genetic Risk

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Internal Medicine (Dr Lloyd), Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, and the Departments of Surgery (Dr Reyna and Mr Whalen) and Internal Medicine (Dr Reyna), University of Arizona, Tucson.

Arch Intern Med. 2001;161(20):2411-2413. doi:10.1001/archinte.161.20.2411

A patient from Phoenix, Ariz, recently diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus has a deep tan. He read about hemochromatosis on a Web site and is concerned that he might have the condition. His mother died of congestive heart failure and his paternal uncle had diabetes mellitus and severe arthritis. He wants to obtain testing for an HFE gene mutation. He asks, "If I have the gene, could that be the reason for my diabetes mellitus? What should I do if I am tested and I have the gene? If I do not have the gene, could I still have the disease? Should my children be tested?"

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