Regular Departments
November 1968

Book Reviews

Arch Intern Med. 1968;122(5):459-460. doi:10.1001/archinte.1968.00040010459021

The exponential nature of the increase in medical knowledge is vividly illustrated by the impressive bulk of this text, comprising 1,258 double-column pages replete with charts, figures, beautifully reproduced electron micrographs, and even photographs of contributors. The wealth of material boggles the imagination, and chapters go far beyond the standard one gland-one chapter dictum. Since the size of the volume precludes it being read straight through (by any but the most compulsive), some of the most perceptive sections may, sadly enough, be missed. Typical is the most lucid discussion by Rasmussen that delineates endocrine control mechanisms in general and clearly presents the current direction of biochemical research. It should be required reading for all who wish a general familiarity with the integrative role of cell metabolism.

A major portion of the text is given over to diseases of glands of greatest clinical significance, notably the thyroid, adrenal, and pancreas. Ingbar