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August 1908

BLOOD PRESSURE IN ONE HUNDRED CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS AT HIGH ALTITUDE.

Author Affiliations

SILVER CITY, N. M.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1908;II(1):42-54. doi:10.1001/archinte.1908.00050060045002

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Abstract

In recent years much has been written concerning blood pressure and its relation to many pathologic conditions. Its relation to tuberculosis has been discussed by many writers, but in all the literature I have failed to see any reports from sanatoria situated at high altitudes.

From the observations made here in the New Mexico Cottage Sanatorium, at an altitude of 6,000 feet, we are led to believe that altitude has an important influence on blood pressure. As will be shown in the course of this article, our average pressure is far higher than that at lower elevations or at sea level; and this, too, as a rule, with cases in the far advanced stages of the disease. Here the majority of our cases fall into this class; for it is a fact that in the west, nowadays, we see mostly advanced cases or those in whom the disease

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