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Article
September 1908

A STUDY OF THE VOLUME AND SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF ORGANS.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1908;II(2):171-175. doi:10.1001/archinte.1908.00050070072006
Abstract

The three linear dimensions in which the size of an organ examined at autopsy is recorded give to the reader a rather indefinite idea as to the actual size of the specimen. Viscera are irregular. The expressions "the organ is large," "fairly large," "voluminous," "larger than its fellow," "contracted," "splenic tumor," etc., are inaccurate and unscientific.

In order to determine and accurately register the size of any viscus, the following plan, employed at some institutions for registering the volume of the brain, should be adopted : Each organ as it is removed is submerged in a vessel filled with water to a level at which an overflow is provided. The water displaced overflows into a container graduated in cubic centimeters; the amount so obtained represents the volume or displacement of the organ in cubic centimeters. The organs are weighed in grams; the weight, divided by the displacement, equals

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