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Article
October 1908

THE URINARY FINDINGS IN A SERIES OF INFANTS SUFFERING FROM INTESTINAL INFECTION.

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE; NEW YORK

From the Laboratory of the Thomas Wilson Sanitarium.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1908;II(3):241-252. doi:10.1001/archinte.1908.00050080043004
Abstract

Concerning the condition of the kidneys in infants suffering from intestinal infection there has been a wide difference of opinion. In a careful review of the literature by Morse1 in 1899 the conflicting views were graphically stated. Among those whose opinions are founded on large personal experience may be mentioned Kjellberg,2 who in 1870 found nephritis on autopsy in 67 out of 143 infants dying of acute or chronic enteritis. In 3 non-fatal and 15 fatal cases of the same kind the urine contained albumin, casts and leucocytes. Holt, writing twenty years later in Keating's Cyclopædia,3 asserts that, although cloudy swelling of the renal tubules is common in enteritis as in other febrile diseases, true nephritis is uncommon, and that albumin in large amount, renal epithelium, and casts are exceedingly rare. Nevertheless, Czerny and Moser4 in 1894 found nephritis in 11 fatal cases of

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