[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1909

METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE BLOOD FLOW IN THE ARMPRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

Department of Theory and Practice, University of Michigan

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1909;III(3):254-256. doi:10.1001/archinte.1909.00050140084007
Abstract

Of the various factors entering into the problem of circulatory dynamics the most important is the rate of blood flow. This can be determined experimentally by Ludwig's Stromuhr or some of its various modifications. More recently T. G. Brodie1 has estimated the blood flow in an organ by suddenly occluding its efferent vein and measuring the change of volume by an oncometer. Under these circumstances the arterial blood enters the organ with undiminished speed at first, but soon the flow is retarded by the rise of pressure in the veins and capillaries. The organ therefore swells rapidly at first and progressively more slowly. The earliest portion of this curve represents the rate at which the blood enters under normal conditions. Brodie has shown that this method gives as reliable results as the Stromuhr. It is applicable only to organs from which all efferent blood can be

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×