[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.176.107. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1912

ORTHODIASCOPIC OBSERVATIONS CONCERNING A CERTAIN TYPE OF SMALL HEART AND ITS RELATIONS TO SOME GENERAL SYSTEMIC AFFECTIONS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1912;IX(3):346-361. doi:10.1001/archinte.1912.00060150075004
Abstract

The founder of modern medicine, Laennec, who was the first to elaborate methods of auscultation and percussion and to found thereon an almost complete system of clinical medicine, had already made a profound study of the relative size of the heart under varying pathological conditions. In later times the work of Virchow, of Beneke and the laborious and admirably accurate work of Wilhelm Müller contributed largely to our knowledge of the subject. It is needless to dwell on the wonderful achievements of the more modern work, both physiological and anatomical, of Engelmann, His, Aschoff, Tawara, Keith, Albrecht, and numerous others. But all these studies and experiments were done either on the hearts of animals or on the human heart after death. Then came the time when the Roentgen rays were applied to internal medicine and by these means the observer was enabled for the first time to study

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×