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Article
April 1912

THE CAUSE OF MALARIAL ANEMIA, AND THE INTRAVASCULAR MIGRATIONS OF THE MALARIAL PARASITE

Author Affiliations

NEW LONDON, CONN

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1912;IX(4):420-444. doi:10.1001/archinte.1912.00060160021004
Abstract

All investigators agree that in few conditions does so marked and rapid anemia develop as in malaria. The rapidity of its development, as well as its severity, has often excited notice. For example, Dionisi1 noted a reduction of 500,000 red corpuscles in twelve hours, and also demonstrated that there is no intimate relation between the number of parasites present in the peripheral blood and the destruction of red corpuscles during a paroxysm. Grawitz2 noted a loss of 4,000,000 red corpuscles in six days. Kelsch3 found a diminution of red corpuscles during intervals between paroxysms, with an especially great decrease in cases of acute malarial infections, one case showing 500,000 to the cubic millimeter. Marchiafava and Bignami4 found that there was a destruction of red corpuscles in non-febrile cases of larval malaria, and Ewing5 found postfebrile anemia to be the rule in all very

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