[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1910

THE QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATION OF ALBUMIN IN THE URINE

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Clinical Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University and Hospital, Baltimore, and the Laboratory of Physiological Chemistry, Mount Sinai Hospital. New York City.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1910;V(3):313-324. doi:10.1001/archinte.1910.00050250098006
Abstract

The Esbach method is undoubtedly the most widely used simple procedure for the quantitative estimation of albumin in the urine; and, notwithstanding its well-known inaccuracies, it is still used in the majority of laboratories and hospitals. For exact work several accurate quantitative methods are available, but for the clinician the Esbach albuminometer is practically the only quantitative instrument suited to his needs.

A great deal has been written about the Esbach method and its various shortcomings. Emerson and Baumgarten1 give a series of comparative results obtained by estimation with the Purdy centrifuge and Esbach methods controlled by weighing. They conclude that neither method is satisfactory, and that the Esbach tubes as ordinarily used cannot be relied on for even approximate results. They also state that unless the tubes be kept at a constant temperature, the method is practically useless for comparative quantitative estimations,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×