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Article
April 1910

III. THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF VASOMOTOR DRUGS IN RENAL HEMORRHAGES

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1910;V(4):348-360. doi:10.1001/archinte.1910.00050260025002
Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION  Since the lowering of blood-pressure during hemorrhage contributes materially to its natural diminution, it is argued that a further reduction in pressure should favor a more prompt cessation. This doctrine, so frequently emphasized as fundamental in the treatment of bleeding, loses sight of the important fact that, during a hemorrhage, all the protective mechanisms of the body are called into play to maintain the bloodpressure, so that the brain, which is the organ most susceptible to anemia, shall receive a supply approaching the normal. To accomplish this the peripheral vessels constrict, the heart beats faster and lymph flows in from the surrounding tissues.1 Consequently, I have contended that any agent that counteracts these mechanisms is as unphysiological as those that increase the bleeding.A study of the effect of vasomotor drugs on the activity of the respiratory center during hemorrhage has strengthened this view. If

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