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Article
June 1910

THE SYMPTOM-COMPLEX OF THE ACUTE POSTERIOR POLIOMYELITIS OF THE GENICULATE, AUDITORY, GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL AND PNEUMOGASTRIC GANGLIA

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1910;V(6):631-675. doi:10.1001/archinte.1910.00050280097006
Abstract

In previous communications1 I have already elaborated in some detail the symptomatology and complications of the posterior poliomyelitis of the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve; a syndrome which is characterized by herpes zoster oticus, facial palsy and auditory symptoms. When the ganglion alone is involved, herpes oticus results, the eruption being distributed in the central portions of the external ear. If the inflammation extends from the ganglion to the nerve-trunk, facial palsy follows; and when deafness and symptoms of Ménière's disease occur they are produced either by an extension of the inflammatory process to the adjacent auditory nerve or by simultaneous involvement of the peripheral auditory ganglia (Fig. 1).

I shall now consider the localization of the same process in the peripheral root ganglia of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and auditory nerves, their respective neural complications and the various clinical combinations which may occur.2 I shall

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