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Article
July 1910

THE BOVINE TYPE OF TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH THREE CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS IN MAN

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Comparative Pathology, Harvard University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1910;VI(1):19-23. doi:10.1001/archinte.1910.00050290024003
Abstract

Practically all cases of human tuberculosis with which the bovine type of bacillus has been found associated have had their origin in the digestive tract. The invasion takes place either through the mouth or throat into the cervical lymph-nodes, or through the intestinal mucosa into the mesenteric lymph-nodes. Although the infection of cows takes place largely through the air, and first shows itself in the mediastinal or bronchial lymph-nodes, yet there is at present no evidence that adult human beings exposed to the dust of cow-stables contract tuberculosis in this way. The three cases to be briefly reported are also the result of intestinal infection.

REPORTS OF CASES 

Case 1 (Human No. 251).  —For the autopsy notes and material of this case I am indebted to Prof. E. E. Southard, who also supplied the following data concerning the history of the patient:

Patient.  —Man, born in Massachusetts, in

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