[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1910

THE PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF PULSE-PRESSURE CHANGES DURING HEMORRHAGE

Author Affiliations

Ann Arbor, Mich

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1910;VI(3):281-292. doi:10.1001/archinte.1910.00050310050003
Abstract

Hemorrhage is a pathological process in which all organs suffer in function from the loss of blood, and the severity of the case depends not only on the quantity of blood lost, but also on the ability of the body to manage with that remaining. Consequently, our stock of facts for formulating a prognosis consists, first of all, of those data which indicate the degree that the body mechanisms are compensating and the extent to which the important functions are interfered with; and, in the second place, of those which indicate the progress of the bleeding itself. Thus the reaction of the higher nervous centers to the anemia is judged by the state of consciousness or stupor and the response of the corneal and pupillary reflexes, as well as the activities of the respiratory and cardio-inhibitory centers, as these are mirrored in the changed character of respiration

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×