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Article
September 1910

THE PREVALENCE OF HOOKWORM INFECTION IN THE BETTER CLASS OF SOUTHERN WHITE PEOPLE

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1910;VI(3):303-306. doi:10.1001/archinte.1910.00050310074006
Abstract

We offer the results of this investigation as an indication of the prevalence of hookworm and other worm infections among the better class of people in the South. Statistics are at hand showing the prevalence among army recruits, hospital patients, laborers and the poorer class, but statistics showing the prevalence of the disease among the upper classes are wanting. Recently Winthrop examined sixty-six students in the Mobile Medical College, of whom thirty-three, or 50 per cent., were found infected.

Dr. Dock suggested the examination of the students of Tulane University because the results might serve as an index of the prevalence among apparently healthy individuals representing a large area of the South.

The total number of students examined was three hundred and fifteen. Of this number one hundred and four, or 33 per cent., harbored intestinal parasites; seventy-nine, or 25 per cent., were infected with hookworms. There were

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