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Article
February 1911

THE ENERGY METABOLISM OF MOTHER AND CHILD JUST BEFORE AND JUST AFTER BIRTH

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; NEW YORK

From the Nutrition Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Boston.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1911;VII(2):184-222. doi:10.1001/archinte.1911.00060020049004
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  The first attempt to estimate the energy production of the mammalian fetus was that of Pflüger1 forty-two years ago. Pflüger expressed the opinion, largely on a priori grounds, that the gaseous exchange of the fetus as compared with that of the mother must be insignificant in amount. This idea was apparently supported by the work of Cohnstein and Zuntz2 on the embryo sheep, but was strongly contested by Wiener3 and others, and within the past ten years has been refuted definitely.4It is mainly to the physiological institutes of Copenhagen and Budapest headed by Bohr and Tangl, respectively, that we are indebted for the newer conception that the gaseous exchange, and therefore the energy production, of the animal embryo is greater per unit of weight than that of the adult organism. Rubner,5 however, has drawn attention to the fact that the mammalian embryo

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