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Article
September 1912

THE EFFECT OF A SKIN IRRITANT ON THE LOCAL BLOOD-FLOW IN THE HAND

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1912;X(3):196-201. doi:10.1001/archinte.1912.00060210030003
Abstract

It is common knowledge that skin irritants produce reddening of the skin, which may under certain circumstances be followed by the appearance of vesicles, pustules, or a diffuse dermatitis. The effect on the general and the local circulation has been particularly studied in the case of carbon dioxid baths, which differ from most other baths in that they produce a local reddening of the skin. According to O. Miller and his colaborators1 the reddening of the skin which occurs in these baths is a cutaneous phenomenon and it is not associated with a relaxation of the deeper arteries. Strasburger,2 who sought to avoid the technical difficulties of working with carbon dioxid baths, added spirits of mustard (Senfspiritus) to the water which surrounded the arm in a plethysmograph and he found that when the arm assumed a red color comparable to that seen in the carbon dioxid bath, the

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