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Article
September 1912

CONCERNING THE PRESENCE IN URINE OF CERTAIN PRESSOR BASES

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES, CAL.

From the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute, Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1912;X(3):202-213. doi:10.1001/archinte.1912.00060210036004
Abstract

Probably the first work on the presence of toxic alkaloid-like bases in putrid meat and urine, and their significance for purposes of diagnosis in disease, was done by Selmi in 1880. In 1884 Bouchard began his development of the idea of urinary toxicity as measured by biological experimentation, and its application to clinical problems. Bouchard's work, and that of other French writers, gave an impetus to the investigation of the chemical character of the toxic elements in urine; and in this connection, attention became directed particularly toward those of a basic alkaloid-like nature, and many such have been identified.1

In 1906 Abelous2 directed attention to a certain phase of this subject, by isolating from putrid meat a substance, basic in nature, which, when injected into animals, produced a pronounced rise in blood-pressure. He was unable to identify this base with any degree of accuracy, but assigned

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