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Article
December 1912

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE SYMPTOMATOLOGY OF THROMBOPHLEBITIS IN TYPHOID

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1912;X(6):534-559. doi:10.1001/archinte.1912.00060240016002
Abstract

Everyone who sees any considerable number of typhoid fever cases year after year must have been struck with the fact that, while most of these run a fairly typical and uneventful course, there is a very considerable group of cases in which the latter part of the course, or the period of convalescence, is marked by a number of obscure and apparently unrelated symptoms and complications. If one takes the trouble to read over a large number of case histories and charts of typhoid this fact is brought out even more clearly and forcibly; for many of these incidents are so transient and apparently insignificant that they fail to make much impression and are readily forgotten.

These symptoms include various forms of irregular febrile movement; sudden pulmonary and pleural symptoms; sudden and unaccountable abdominal symptoms; repeated chills, without obvious cause; pain, discomfort and stiffness in the legs or

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