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Article
January 1913

A FURTHER STUDY OF THE VENTILATION OF SLEEPING CARS (THE STEEL CAR)

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1913;XI(1):66-83. doi:10.1001/archinte.1913.00060250073004
Abstract

Two years ago I presented before the American Public Health Association the results of a study of the ventilation of sleeping cars.1 An attempt was made to determine the amount of fresh air which enters the running car under various conditions of operation, the places of entrance of the air, its distribution, and the general direction of its currents. Two plans of ventilating were considered in that study, which were called "natural ventilation" and "ventilation by exhaustion."

The essential architectural features of the standard American railway car are, as they concern the question under discussion, that it contains one long room with end doors opening to vestibules, and side windows, and was originally intended to receive its air supply through a row of small windows set in near the roof line on either side and called decksashes. Part of the cars investigated in the study referred to

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