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May 1913

A CASE OF INFANTILISM ASSOCIATED WITH PITUITARY NEOPLASM

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1913;XI(5):523-529. doi:10.1001/archinte.1913.00060290057007
Abstract

Illness depending on pituitary disturbances is becoming more frequently recognized. The case of infantilism here reported is presented as an example of an interesting condition worthy of addition to the records of pituitary disorders.

CASE REPORT  History.—H. H., male, aged 26 years, occupation errand boy, weight 70 pounds; height 3 feet 8 inches, entered the Royal Victoria Hospital on account of headaches, vomiting and vertigo. He was a full term healthy child of 9 pounds at birth, and grew quite normally and naturally until the age of 10 years; he has not grown any since. As long as he can remember he has had attacks of vertigo, and at times double vision. About every month he was troubled with an attack of severe frontal headache, which sometimes darted through to the occiput; it was as a rule much worse during the day than at night. Vomiting was

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