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Article
August 1913

THE RELATION OF THE HYPOPHYSIS TO GROWTH AND THE EFFECT OF FEEDING ANTERIOR AND POSTERIOR LOBE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Experimental Therapeutics, University of Chicago, S. A. Matthews, director.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1913;XII(2):137-145. doi:10.1001/archinte.1913.00070020023002
Abstract

As observed by the clinician, there are two clinical entities, both disturbances of growth, ascribed to disturbed functioning of the hypophysis. One is acromegaly, characterized by enlargement of certain bones; the other, delayed development with adiposity and genital atrophy. When the former occurs in early life, gigantism results; when it first appears after maturity, enlargement of only certain portions of the bony skeleton is observed. In the other type, when the disturbance appears in early life, there is delayed skeletal development, with adiposity and failure of sexual evolution; when it appears after maturity, adiposity and sexual atrophy.

Pierre Marie, in 1886, first called attention to the relation between acromegaly and the hypophysis, although Carl von Langer in 1872, in an anatomical study of giants, referred to a certain type with enlarged sella turcica. The observations of Marie have been confirmed, until at present it is generally conceded that acromegaly

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