[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1914

THE VALUE OF HEXAMETHYLENAMIN AS AN INTERNAL ANTISEPTIC IN OTHER FLUIDS OF THE BODY THAN URINE

Author Affiliations

Assistant Resident Surgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital BALTIMORE

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1914;XIII(6):841-852. doi:10.1001/archinte.1914.00070120003001
Abstract

In previous communications I have presented a method for the quantitative estimation of formaldehyd in the urine of patients receiving hexamethylenamin by mouth,1 and the results of a study with this method of the value of the internal use of hexamethylenamin as a urinary antiseptic.2 This study on the urine clearly indicates that the conversion of hexamethylenamin into formaldehyd is a simple chemical process which will readily occur in an acid medium, but will not occur in an alkaline medium. It also shows that the amount of this conversion is dependent on the degree of urinary acidity, the duration of exposure to the action of this acidity and the percentage concentration of the drug in it. These facts have a significant bearing on the justification of the wide-spread therapeutic use of hexamethylenamin for other than vesical conditions. It has been recommended as an antiseptic for practically

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×