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Article
June 1914

SOME RELATIONS OF THE BRAIN AND OF THE OLFACTORY APPARATUS TO THE PROCESSES OF IMMUNITY

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1914;XIII(6):856-888. doi:10.1001/archinte.1914.00070120018003
Abstract

The body is provided with three obvious lines of defense against infection, namely, its peripheral epithelium, its blood and lymph, and its tissue cells. The activity of modern investigators has been engrossed almost wholly with study of the last two ; the first has received very little attention. Yet it is indisputable that the epithelial covering of the body must have intrinsic resources of protection against adverse influences which are in such habitual action that its relations should be considered truly physiological, rather than pathological, as its response to adventitious agencies would be. In short, a study of the pathologic physiology of the peripheral epithelium must conceive of it primarily as a mechanism for the prevention of disease rather than, as in the case of the body-fluids and tissues, an establishment for producing the means of cure. While the protoplasm of the surface cells must be endowed with a degree

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