[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1914

A STUDY OF TWENTY-NINE CASES OF ADVANCED PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS TREATED BY ARTIFICIAL PNEUMOTHORAX

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Bedford Hills Sanatorium of the Montefiore Home.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1914;XIV(2):210-235. doi:10.1001/archinte.1914.00070140067003
Abstract

The idea that compression of a lung might exert a beneficial effect on pulmonary tuberculosis was first suggested in 1822 by Carson,1 a physician and physiologist in Liverpool. Ten years later Houghton2 reported a case of pulmonary tuberculosis in which after the occurrence of spontaneous pneumothorax, improvement in many symptoms took place. During the following fifty years the observation was repeatedly made (Stokes,3 Spengler,4 Wellman,5 Späth,6 Potain7 and others) that cases of pulmonary tuberculosis did well when compressed by complicating pleuritic effusions. The resection of ribs resulting in collapse of the lung was advocated by Quincke,8 Spengler9 and others and also produced favorable results. The credit for the introduction of the method of compressing a tuberculous lung by means of producing artificial pneumothorax belongs to Forlanini.10

LEO KESSEL—MAX TASCHMAN 211

His methods have been adopted by Brauer,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×