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Article
November 1914

THE TOTAL NON-PROTEIN NITROGEN AND THE UREA OF THE BLOOD IN HEALTH AND IN DISEASE, AS ESTIMATED BY FOLIN'S METHODS

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Medicine, Yale University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1914;XIV(5):620-649. doi:10.1001/archinte.1914.00070170013002
Abstract

Ever since the time Prévost and Dumas,1 who in 1823, first demonstrated an increase of the urea of the blood after extirpation of the kidneys in animals, the total non-protein nitrogen and the urea of the blood have been the subject of repeated investigations, and have been accorded considerable importance in the diagnosis and prognosis of Bright's disease. Owing, however, to the fact that the methods employed have been various and more or less subject to error, the results obtained have been conflicting. This may be readily seen when we find that the total non-protein nitrogen in the normal person is given as anywhere from 25 to 60 mg. per hundred c.c. of blood. The brilliant methods recently devised by Folin2 render possible the accurate estimation of these substances in a small amount of blood, from 2 to 5 c.c. sufficing for all the analyses. The increase in

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