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November 1914

AN EPIDEMIC OF STREPTOCOCCUS SORE THROAT IN JACKSONVILLE, ILL., WHICH WAS TRACED TO THE MILK OF COWS AFFECTED WITH STREPTOCOCCUS MASTITIS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1914;XIV(5):650-661. doi:10.1001/archinte.1914.00070170043003
Abstract

During the past winter there occurred in Jacksonville, Ill., a city of 15,000 people, an unusual number of cases of sore throat. In order to check the spread of the disease, twenty-five physicians volunteered their services for the systematic examination of all schoolchildren. The epidemic began soon after Thanksgiving Day, 1913, and reached its height in the month of December. In January many persons were on the sick list, but comparatively few new cases were reported. Early in February the number of cases of tonsillitis was not much above the average of other winters. At the request of local physicians the State Food Commission made an investigation of the milk-supply, but it reported nothing to indicate a causal relationship between the milk and the epidemic.

Later in January, through the kindness and cooperation of the local physicians and the city health commissioner, we were enabled to study the epidemic from

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