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Article
December 1914

STUDY XXII: THE EFFECT OF THEOBROMIN SODIUM SALICYLATE IN ACUTE EXPERIMENTAL NEPHRITIS, AS MEASURED BY THE EXCRETION OF PHENOLSULPHONEPHTHALEIN

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Laboratory of the Theory and Practice of Physic, Harvard Medical School, and the Medical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1914;XIV(6):827-843. doi:10.1001/archinte.1914.00070180060005
Abstract

The therapeutic efficacy of diuretic drugs on patients with acute nephritis has been discussed by most writers in their description of methods of management of acute nephritis. The views expressed have been based largely on clinical observation, and there has been relatively little experimental evidence1 accumulated in support of the claims made for the usefulness, within certain limitations, of diuretic drugs in acute nephritis. Inasmuch as clinical observation of acute nephritis is much hampered by the infrequency of uncomplicated cases and by the difficulties in determining whether any two patients actually present comparable renal lesions, it has seemed desirable to have more observations under experimental conditions in which some of the factors are controllable in the hope that gradually data may be accumulated as a basis for a more efficient method of treating acute nephritis. The following experiments are reported for this reason. Though inconclusive in

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