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Article
February 1917

A COMPARISON OF TWO METHODS OF VACCINATING AGAINST TYPHOID FEVER

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From From the Department of Medicine of the University of California Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XIX(2):276-292. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00080210117006
Abstract

Of the fifteen or twenty recognized methods of immunizing against typhoid fever,1 the one most commonly used in this country has been that employed in the United States Army, which consists of three injections at seven or ten day intervals, the first of 500 million and the second and third of 1 billion each of a heat-killed culture of a mild strain of typhoid bacillus. Another method which has been extensively used in California in the last three years is that introduced by Gay and Claypole.2 This vaccine consists of alcohol-killed cultures of the typhoid organism which have previously been treated by an immune serum, a so-called sensitized vaccine. The cultures are then dried and ground, suspended in salt solution, and the sediment redried, and weighed amounts are used in immunizing. Experimentally in rabbits such a vaccine was thought to produce more permanent immunity than nonsensitized vaccine,

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