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Article
March 1917

THE EFFECT OF BANDAGING OF THE LEGS ON THE RATE OF BLOOD FLOW IN THE FEET

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the H. K. Cushing Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XIX(3):335-343. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00080220002001
Abstract

It has been suggested by some observers of the condition known as ``trench-foot,'' which was so common among the soldiers in the trenches in Belgium and France, especially during the first winter of the war, that obstruction of the venous return by the puttees worn by the British troops was an important contributory factor.

The observations which form the subject of this paper are concerned only with the effect of relatively short applications of the puttees. Having been made in a laboratory on a normal man, they do not reproduce what is probably an important condition for the development of trench-foot, if the pressure of the puttees has anything to do with the condition, namely, the swelling under an already tight, wet, and dirty bandage. So far as the technic of the observations is concerned, it would have been easy enough to study the circulatory changes

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