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Article
May 1917

INTESTINAL EOSINOPHILIA, WITH REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Medical Division of the Stanford Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XIX(5_I):695-698. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00080240014002
Abstract

The occurrence of eosinophilic cells or Charcot-Leyden crystals in the mucus of stools has been occasionally reported almost ever since Ehrlich first described the eosinophil in 1879. They have been found with greatest frequency in cases of parasitic disease, especially amebiasis and hookworm disease, and in the latter condition the finding has been reported to be almost a constant one. It has also been known for a long time that they may occur in certain non-parasitic conditions, notably mucous colitis. But the great variability of the intestinal eosinophilia in cases otherwise entirely similar has made the finding rather a clinical enigma than a sign of any diagnostic importance. For this reason Schmidt2 has considered it inadvisable to attempt any grouping of cases on this basis. In his opinion eosinophils may occur in varying numbers in intestinal mucus in almost any type of colitis. In a few cases, however,

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