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May 1917

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF EMBRYONAL FAT CELLS IN CERTAIN PATHOLOGIC CONDITIONS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Pathologic Laboratories, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XIX(5_I):699-708. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00080240018003
Abstract

There are two outstanding theories concerning the histogenesis of the fat cell — one, that it is a cell set apart in early life for the specific purpose of producing fat, primitive fat organs, so-called, being found in various localities in the form of small groups of stellate or spindle cells richly permeated by capillary vessels. The cytoplasm of the primitive fat cell is finely granular and stains pinkish with eosin. As development proceeds the cell accumulates fat granules which fuse into globular shape, the cell itself becomes polygonal, then spherical in outline, the nucleus is peripherally displaced and finally compressed against the cell membrane, and the cytoplasm is reduced to a minimum. The other theory accounts for the origin of the fat cell on the basis of metaplasia of the fibroblast with the accumulation of fat within its body, and it is assumed that the fibroblast, when it

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