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Article
May 1917

THE HUMAN AND ANIMAL LIVER AFTER ALCOHOL

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE, WIS.

From the Pathological Laboratory, Boston City Hospital, and the Pathological Department, Marquette University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XIX(5_I):786-800. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00080240105008
Abstract

Long before the microscope came to play the important rôle in pathology that it now does, the liver, in common with other large organs, presented changes for gross study. Thus Laennec1 in his work on auscultation, published in 1829, mentions in a case of ascites the presence of a small liver with coarsely granular surface. Owing to the yellowish color of the organ he applied the term cirrhose. The term cirrhosis has survived, and, like other terms that are not applied to given conditions of definite etiology, it has not always been used in the same way. We do not hesitate to call the condition in which there is a complete loss of liver lobules with the formation of wide bands of connective tissue, a cirrhosis, but if there is a moderate increase of connective tissue about the portal areas and along the interlobular lines, the term sclerosis is likely

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