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Article
September 1915

THE EFFECT OF HEMORRHAGE AND OF OCCLUSION OF THE CAROTID ARTERIES ON VASOMOTOR IRRITABILITY

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Physiology, Northwestern University Medical School; CHICAGO

From the Laboratory of Physiology of the Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1915;XVI(3):456-464. doi:10.1001/archinte.1915.00080030117009
Abstract

The mechanism which controls blood pressure is one of the most complicated with which the physician has to deal. Arterial pressure depends on two factors—the amount of excitation and the irritability and the resistance to flow in the blood vessels. Peripheral resistance in turn depends to some extent on the elasticity of the arterial walls and the relative viscosity of the blood, but more particularly on the aggregate bore of the terminal arterial channels—the arterioles. This bore is quite variable and depends on several factors. The chemical composition of the blood itself has an important influence on the muscle cells of the vessels. The presence or absence of epinephrin is an example in point. The concentration of carbon dioxid is another factor the importance of which has only lately begun to be realized. The temperature of the blood is probably also of some practical significance. But the most important influence

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