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Article
November 1915

THE COAGULATION TEST FOR SYPHILIS, AS DEVISED BY HIRSCHFELD AND KLINGER

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilis, the H. K. Cushing Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, and the Department of Pathology of Western Reserve University and Lakeside Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1915;XVI(5):880-889. doi:10.1001/archinte.1915.00080050189010
Abstract

Since the first appearance of the Wassermann test for syphilis, many short cuts and modifications have been devised or suggested and, we regret to say, most of them have failed to stand the test of time as well as the original. Moreover, several entirely new methods of diagnosis have been devised, of which Noguchi's cutaneous test has probably come the closest to being satisfactory, and that only in certain stages of the disease. In 1914, Hirschfeld and Klinger reported to the Congress of Internal Medicine at Wiesbaden that they had succeeded, by means of the process of coagulation, in distinguishing a syphilitic from a nonsyphilitic serum. At that time they had examined about 250 serums; they later reported that about 500 had been tested by a collaborator, and since then, in a personal communication, have written that around 1,000 successful tests have been made. During the past nine months,

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