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Article
January 1916

THE EFFECT OF CONTINUOUS ELECTRIC LIGHT IN EXPERIMENTAL ARTHRITIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Departments of Therapeutics and Experimental Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Illinois.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1916;XVII(1):78-81. doi:10.1001/archinte.1916.00080070096006
Abstract

It has been observed that a patient suffering from rheumatic pains and joints is very often relieved by the application of incandescent light either locally by means of one, two, or three bulbs with a metal reflector, or by a more general application in the form of the electric light bath. Although much is written in the literature on light as a therapeutic agent, we have been unable to find any previous work done to bring out experimentally this particular phase of treatment.

The following is the report of a study of experimental arthritis in rabbits and its treatment by means of the incandescent electric light.

Preliminary standardizations were made to ascertain: (1) The amount of light that could be used on a normal rabbit without causing distress, loss of weight, or an increase in temperature; (2) the dosage of an organism that would produce in all cases an arthritis

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