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Article
February 1916

A STUDY OF THE LIPIN CONTENT OF A CASE OF GAUCHER'S DISEASE IN AN INFANT

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Department of Pathology of the School of Medicine of Western Reserve University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1916;XVII(2):238-259. doi:10.1001/archinte.1916.00080080060005
Abstract

Lipoid bodies play an important part in many pathologic processes, especially in those involving the spleen and lymph nodes and other blood-forming organs which, until recently, were not suspected of bearing any relation to the distribution of the lipins of the body. Cells which contain considerable lipoid substances are usually characterized, in routine histologic sections, by the relatively large amount of pale, more or less uniformly vacuolated or honeycombed cytoplasm, and small rather deeply stained and often eccentrically placed nuclei. The vacuoles in the cytoplasm represent spaces left by lipoid material that has been dissolved during embedding. In fresh tissue this material does not react typically to the various microchemical reactions for neutral fat. Clusters of such lipoid cells have been frequently noted in chronic inflammations such as chronic aortitis and chronic salpingitis, especially where there is considerable lymphoid infiltration (Pick,1 Krompecher2) ; but it is only in

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