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March 1916

THE URIC ACID SOLVENT POWER OF URINE AFTER ADMINISTRATION OF PIPERAZIN, LYSIDIN, LITHIUM CARBONATE AND OTHER ALKALIES

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

From the Department of Biochemistry, Medical School, University of Oregon.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1916;XVII(3):405-414. doi:10.1001/archinte.1916.00080090064006
Abstract

In a recent paper1 I reported the results of an investigation of the uric acid dissolving power of hexamethylenamin. The mode of action of that drug is quite different from that of the rest of those substances which have been classed as "uric acid solvents." The latter, if they act at all as solvents, do so by virtue of being basic substances. The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation of the solvent power of the most important members of this class.

The organic compounds piperazin and lysidin are amine derivatives, and the nitrogen of their molecules imparts to these substances a basic character so that they combine with acids. They are supposed to form salts with uric acid which are very soluble. And it is true that in aqueous solution they dissolve a very large amount of uric acid (see Table 10).

Lithium carbonate and

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