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Article
May 1916

THE PRESENT STATUS OF MAGNESIUM SULPHATE IN THE TREATMENT OF TETANUS

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

From the Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Public Health, University of Minnesota.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1916;XVII(5):677-703. doi:10.1001/archinte.1916.00080110090008
Abstract

Ever since the introduction of antitetanus serum by Behring and Kitasato1 in 1890 there has been more or less increasing disappointment because of the numerous failures after the therapeutic application of this agent. Indeed it was early recognized, even by those who claimed great merit for antitoxin, that in most cases of tetanus it was absolutely necessary to employ other means for the control of violent spasms and the conservation of the patient's strength. Even if, in the end, the serum could neutralize and render harmless the otherwise fatal toxin, it had no immediate effect upon the exhausting and dreaded muscular paroxysms. Consequently, for the relief of these conditions the attending physician was forced to utilize those sedative and anesthetic drugs, which, in one form or another, have been employed in tetanus ever since the disease has been known. In this, as in other diseases, there

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