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Article
September 1916

A COMPARISON, IN VARIOUS DISEASES, OF THE CARBON DIOXID TENSION IN THE ALVEOLAR AIR (PLESCH METHOD) WITH THE AMOUNT OF CARBON DIOXID IN THE VENOUS BLOOD (VAN SLYKE'S METHOD)

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1916;XVIII(3):304-312. doi:10.1001/archinte.1916.00080160017002
Abstract

With the increasing interest among clinicians in regard to the amount of carbon dioxid in the blood and its relation to problems in respiration and acidosis, it is important, for the estimation of the carbon dioxid, to have methods which are applicable to most diseases and which may be frequently used in the same case.

Although previous to 1905 occasional observations had been made on the carbon dioxid content of the blood in animals and in man, by examination of the blood directly, a marked stimulus was given to this study on the introduction in 1905 by Haldane and Priestley1 of a method for determining the content of carbon dioxid in the alveolar air. It is well recognized that the carbon dioxid tension in alveolar air corresponds closely to that of the blood in the arterial system.

Since 1905 different methods of collecting and studying the alveolar air

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