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Article
December 1916

THE RELATION OF CHANGES IN THE FORM OF THE VENTRICULAR COMPLEX OF THE ELECTROCARDIOGRAM TO FUNCTIONAL CHANGES IN THE HEART

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1916;XVIII(6):830-847. doi:10.1001/archinte.1916.00080190115007
Abstract

Constancy of form is one of the most striking characteristics of electrocardiograms obtained at various times from the same individual. Any change in form is therefore of interest, as it indicates some alteration in the passage of the impulse of contraction through the heart or some change in the manner of the muscular contraction. Changes in heart rate and in the force of contraction are not, as a rule, accompanied by definite alterations in the form of the electrocardiogram.

The ventricular portion of the electrocardiogram is composed of a series of waves and is initiated by a group of three waves, the so-called Q, R, S group. Of these, only the R wave is constant in normal individuals in records obtained by the three leads of Einthoven. There are at present differences of opinion as to the functional activity of the ventricles responsible for this group of waves.

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