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Article
July 1917

MULTIPLE HEMANGIOMAS OF THE SKIN ASSOCIATED WITH DYSPITUITARISM

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XX(1):24-31. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00090010031003
Abstract

Scattering angiomas (telangiectases) of the skin are frequently found in apparently normal persons and have no pathologic significance. On the other hand, they may develop in large numbers and in varying sizes on the skin of persons with diseases of the liver (cirrhosis and cancer), in chronic jaundice from gallstones, or simple catarrhal jaundice, also in tertiary lues (S. Ehrmann,1 Trawinski2), and as a result of Roentgen-ray skin exposure (Kingsbury3).

A family form of multiple telangiectases of the skin and mucous membranes, with recurring epistaxis, has been described by Osler,4 and later by Hanes5 and Langmead.6

In this group of cases the dilated capillaries are confined largely to the mucous membranes of the mouth and nose and the skin of the face. The tendency to recurring nasal hemorrhages is a prominent feature and there is an hereditary history of recurring hemorrhages in the family.

An exceedingly rare form of generalized

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