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Article
December 1917

THE EFFECT OF PANCREATECTOMY ON THE CATALASE CONTENT OF THE TISSUES

Author Affiliations

Laboratory of Physiological Chemistry, University of Illinois Medical School CHICAGO; Physiological Laboratory of the University of Illinois URBANA, ILL.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XX(6):892-895. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00090060066006
Abstract

Of the older workers who recognized the coincidence of diabetic symptoms and lesions of the pancreas, the names of Cowley (1788), Bright, Lloyd and Elliotson (1833) and Bouchardat (1883) may be mentioned. Von Mering and Minkowski1 (1889), however, were the first to show that complete pancreatectomy invariably resulted in severe diabetes. Much work has been done and several theories have been advanced in an attempt to explain the fact that when the pancreas is extirpated the animal loses the power of burning carbohydrates. The literature on the subject is so enormous that no attempt will be made to review it. A fairly complete and exhaustive review is made by Allen,2 and by Lusk.3 In very severe cases of diabetes the body is not only unable to burn sugar, but is able to burn fat only as far as beta-oxybutyric acid, and as for the protein, a part of its amino-acids

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